1846 : the saxophone's patent

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The family of saxophones, as described in patent #3226 of March 21, 1846

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Extract from the saxophone's patent

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The baritone saxhorn and the alto saxophone

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FROM THE 8 SAXOPHONES OF ADOLPHE SAX...  The family of saxophones described in patent #3226 of March 21, 1846 is composed thus of eight saxophones:
        “#1: tenor saxophone in Eb
        #2: saxophone in C... The same instrument was also made in Bb
        #3: contrabass saxophone in G; also done in Ab #4: bass saxophone in C, also done in Bb (one tone lower) Saxophones
        #5, 6, 7 and 8 are respectively in the same key as above, but an octave higher.”
Sax also notes the fingering of instruments #1 and 2 and gives a description of the mouthpiece.
... TO A FAMILY OF 7:    This initial family of eight saxophones established by Adolphe Sax was to be recentred on seven saxophones by Georges Kastner, in his “General handbook of military music for use of the French Armies”, published in 1848. At the bottom of plate XXV of his work, the author specifies the nomenclature of the family of the saxophones: “... There exists a whole family: the sopranino Saxophone in F or Eb, the soprano Saxophone in C or Bb, the alto Saxophone in Eb. The Saxophone alto-tenor in Bb. The Saxophone tenor-baritone in Eb. The Saxophone bass in C or B flat, the saxophone contrabass in F or Eb.”
    Although present in theory in Sax’s patent submission and initially envisaged by Ravel for his Bolero, the Sopranino in F was never made. Its part is traditionally handled by the Bb Soprano. While saxophones in the key of C or F initially seemed more suitable for use in symphony orchestras, the failure of this incorporation led to these models being abandoned. Today, the saxophone family is still composed of seven members and remains very close to that which Kastner described:
        Eb sopranino,
        Bb soprano,
        Eb alto,
        Bb tenor,
        Eb baritone,
        Bb bass,
        Eb contrabass.